Christmas and Other Things

I'm posting over at Journezine this morning (thanks, Laury) so go over and check it out: http://www.journezine.com/on-this-particular-christmas-day/

But I do have a verse for today. The whole book of Colossians was my assignment this morning but I didn't have to go far to find an "aha."

Paul begins the letter by complimenting the Colossian believers on the wonderful reports he's received about them. Because of what he has heard the apostle has been praying for that church and his prayer is a significant one.

"For this reason, since the day we heard about you, we have not stopped praying for you" (1:9a, NIV). We're going to stop there for a second. I confess that as my prayer list gets longer, the content of my prayers for individuals gets shorter. But Paul didn't settle for a "Lord, bless the Colossian church." He must have a had a huge prayer list, but the length of the list didn't stop him from being specific about what he was asking on behalf of the people on that list.

"...and asking God to fill you with the knowledge of his will through all spiritual wisdom and understanding" (1:9b, NIV).

Then come a list of outcomes when this request is granted–as Paul is confident it will be.

"And we pray this in order that (1) you may live a life worthy of the Lord and may please him in every way: (2) bearing fruit in every good work, (3) growing in the knowledge of God (4) being strengthened with all power according to his glorious might (5) so that you may have great endurance and patience, (6) and joyfully giving thanks to the Father, who has qualified you to share in the inheritance of the saints in the kingdom of light" (1:10-12, NIV).

I covet prayers like that on my behalf, and I'll bet you do too. So my prayer for you today echoes Paul's prayer: May God fill you with the knowledge of His will and grant you wisdom and understanding so that all the outcomes might be your experience today, and tomorrow, and every day.

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