What Does Salvation Look Like?

Three lessons about salvation back to back.

THE STORY OF THE PHARISEE AND THE TAX COLLECTOR (Luke 18:9-14)

The Pharisee counted on his works to get him through the door to the kingdom. He was totally unconscious of the inadequacy of his self-righteousness. But the tax collector knew what he was: "God, have mercy on me, a sinner" – Luke 18:13b, NIV.

Lesson: Salvation comes to the sincerely repentant heart who sees himself as God sees him.

THE STORY OF THE LITTLE CHILDREN AND JESUS (Luke 18:15-17)

The disciples didn't see in the children what Jesus saw. He rebuked his followers for denying access to those who most showed the attitude that we all need to demonstrate. ". . .anyone who will not receive the kingdom of God like a little child will never enter it" –Luke 18:17. Some people believe that Jesus is referring to the innocence of a child but the Scriptures clearly state that no one is innocent and no one is justified by his own "goodness." But a child does place his trust innocently, without question or worry.

Lesson: Salvation comes to those who trust unconditionally.

THE RICH RULER (Luke 18:18-30)

This man came to Jesus asking what he should do to inherit eternal life. Jesus forced him to acknowledge his own self-righteousness pride. Then the Lord tested his faith by asking him to give everything up to become a Christ-follower. He failed the test: "When he heard this, he became very sad, because he was a man of great wealth" –Luke 18:23, NIV.  He wanted what he had on earth more than what he claimed he wanted in heaven.

Lesson: Salvation comes to those who put the temporal on the altar in order to gain the eternal.

There are those who believe that submitting to the lordship of Christ is something that comes after salvation. While it is true that we constantly need to recommit ourselves to his lordship over our lives, there is also a clear teaching in Scripture that lordship is an integral step in salvation. We do harm by not helping people in search of Christ to understand that salvation is more than "fire insurance;" it is a lifestyle.

Comments

  1. We do harm by not helping people in search of Christ to understand that salvation is more than "fire insurance;" it is a lifestyle.

    LOVE this - and this is a wonderful reminder. Thanks Lynda!

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